Random thoughts from Pencefn

…. an engineer, singer and photographer living in Scotland

Chesterfield Parish Church from the south west

Chesterfield Parish Church – 13 February 2016

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The Parish Church of St Marys and All Saints in Chesterfield is one of the religious establishments in Derbyshire. These days the most prominent feature of the church is the crooked spire.

The Crooked Spire of Chesterfield

The Crooked Spire of Chesterfield
13 February 2016

The current building dates from fourteenth century. Although not part of the original construction, the spire was also added in about 1362. The point of the spire continually moves. Construction was halted early on due to the black death delaying completion for twelve years. I was fortunately to get on a tour of the church, which including climbing the tower to the bottom of the spire, allow the viewing of the inside of the spire and views across Chesterfield to the Peak District.

Inside the Spire

Inside the Spire
13 February 2016

The view west to the Peak District

The view west to the Peak District
13 February 2015

In the 19th century, George Gilbert Scott began a major restoration of the building. New pews were installed and the west end gallery added.

Nave and west end gallery from the ringing chamber

Nave and west end gallery from the ringing chamber
13 February 2016

In the 1940s, the All Saints altar was erected under the tower, an early case of bringing the altar close to the congregation.

All Saints Altar, with the High Altar and east window behind

All Saints Altar, with the High Altar and east window behind
13 February 2016

There are seven other altars around the building, including Holy Cross Chapel.

On the west wall of Holy Cross Chapel

On the west wall of Holy Cross Chapel
13 February 2016

In 1961 a fire destroyed the 1756 organ. This was replaced by the redundant Lewis organ from the Glasgow City Hall in 1963

The 1963 Lewis Organ

The 1963 Lewis Organ
13 February 2016

Around the building are 14 Stations of the Cross, each made from a single piece of wood.

12th Station of the Cross

12th Station of the Cross
13 February 2016

Outside there is a wooden sculpture of a queen bee, on the site of trees that were destroyed during a storm in February 2014.

The Queen Bee

The Queen Bee
13 February 2016

Author: Stewart

An instrumentation engineer who enjoys photography and singing. Working in the West of Scotland; a member of St Mary's Cathedral Glasgow and Southwark Cathedral; and a volunteer guard/signalman on the Ffestiniog Railway in North Wales.

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