Random thoughts from Pencefn

…. an engineer, singer and photographer living in Scotland

Crosshouse Parish Church

Crosshouse Parish Church – 11 June 2016

Leave a comment

Those of you who live in (or know of) West Central Scotland may know about the large general hospital at Kilmarnock. Crosshouse Hospital takes it name from the adjacent village.

In 1882, Crosshouse Parish Church was built to service the mining village of the same name.

Main Door of Crosshouse Parish Church

Main Door of Crosshouse Parish Church
11 June 2016

The movement to build a church in Crosshouse started in 1879, with a committee of 19, chaired by the Rev Alexander Inglis. By early 1880 subscriptions had raised just over £400. In July 1880, Lady Harriet Scott Bentnick (daughter of the 4th Duke of Portland), gave the land for the church and manse for a feu of 5/- (25p) per year and donated £100 to the building fund. With £600 from the Baird Trust and £700 from the Ferguson Trust, the inital estimated cost of £1,770 had been reached. A further £250 was estimated for boundary wall and heating in the building. The foundation stone was laid in 1881. The church was opened for public worship on Sunday 19 March 1882. The accounts for the building at the 1882 amounted to just over £2,755.

From the road the leads to Kilmarnock (and the hospital), the church is prominent with a war memorial in front. To the east is the manse, which was completed in 1887.

South face of Crosshouse Parish Church

South face of Crosshouse Parish Church
11 June 2016

Entering the church, the organ and rose window are featured at the north end of the nave.

The nave looking to the Organ and north rose window.

The nave looking to the Organ and north rose window.
11 June 2016

The original communion table is now used elsewhere in the building, following the gift by the late Elizabeth Well in 1980.

The Elizabeth Well Communion Table

The Elizabeth Well Communion Table
11 June 2016

Provision had been made in the construction of a gallery, to seat 100 people at the south end of the building. This can be seen by the arrangement of the south window, leaving blank wall were the gallery would have been located.

South Window

South Window
11 June 2016

The baptismal font was made out of marble and presented to the congregation by Mr Pollock Morris.

Marble Font

Marble Font
11 June 2016

A legacy was received from his estate in 1901, which was used to install an organ in the building, located under the North Rose Window.

Author: Stewart

An instrumentation engineer who enjoys photography and singing. Working in the West of Scotland; a member of St Mary's Cathedral Glasgow and Southwark Cathedral; and a volunteer guard/signalman on the Ffestiniog Railway in North Wales.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s