Random thoughts from Pencefn

…. an engineer, singer and photographer living in Scotland

West Towers from the Cloisters


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Durham Cathedral – 19 May 2018

A day with a lot of distractions, including two football cup finals and a certain wedding in Windsor, saw us heading to Durham Cathedral for Choral Evensong, sung by RSCM Scottish Voices.

Situated on promontory high above a loop of the River Wear, adjacent to Durham Castle, Durham Cathedral dates from the late 11th Century under the first Prince-Bishop, William of St. Carilef (or William of Calais), appointed by William the Conqueror. The cathedral is approached from the Durham Market Place, via Saddler Street and Owen Street to Palace Green. On the north side of the green is Durham Castle, and of the south side is the cathedral.

Durham Cathedral from Palace Green

Durham Cathedral from Palace Green
19 May 2018

However, the See of Durham, takes its origins much earlier Diocese of Lindisfarne in the 7th century, although it was translated to York 664 and prior to going back to Lindisfarne in 678. Saint Cuthbert, who was Bishop of Lindisfarne fron 685 to 687, was instrumental in the foundation of Durham Cathedral. As a result of Viking raids, the monks of Lindisfarne left the island in 875, taking the relics (body) of St Cuthbert, initially settling in Chester-le-Street until 995, when further Viking incursions took place. Legend has it that they following two milk maids who were searching for a dun coloured cow to the peninsula of the River Wear. This is where they settled building the initial church on the site made of wood to house the relics, prior to being replace by a stone church, known as the white church, which was substantially complete (apart for he tower) in 1018. The following of the cow is commemorated by a carving in the north east side of the current building.

Carving of Milkmaids and Cow.

Carving of Milkmaids and Cow.
19 May 2018

On the north west door of the cathedral is a knocker. In the middle ages anyone who had committed a serious offence could claim sanctuary by knocking on the door. They then had 37 days to put their affairs in order then stand trial or leave the country. The original 12th century knocker is now on display in the Open Treasure exhibition, whilst a replica is on the door.

Sanctuary Knocker on the North West Door.

Sanctuary Knocker on the North West Door.
19 May 2018

Photography is not allowed in the cathedral, except to a limited number of photography evenings, however pictures can be taken in the Cloisters.

Central Tower from the Cloisters

Central Tower from the Cloisters
19 May 2018

In the cloisters that are a large number of carving on the roof.

Cloister Roof Carving

Cloister Roof Carving
19 May 2018

In some of the corners there are carvings of saints.

Gilded Carving of a Saint

Gilded Carving of a Saint
19 May 2018

Walking to the east end of the building along the appropriately named Dun Cow Lane, the east end can be viewed from North Bailey.

East End of Durham Cathedral

East End of Durham Cathedral
19 May 2018

To the south of the Cathedral, where North Bailey becomes South Bailey, there is a gateway that takes you into a small courtyard called The College, including a property with an Episcopal Crest above the door.

Episcopal Door in Durham Cathedral College

Episcopal Door in Durham Cathedral College
19 May 2018

Walking through the College, takes us back into the Cloisters.

The day was for singing, so some of the back stage areas were seen including the Song School and the Chapter House. The music for Choral Evensong included:

  • Responses: Herbert Sumsion
  • Canticles: Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis in B flat (Sir John Stainer)
  • Anthem: Evening Hymn (Henry Balfour-Gardiner)

We were under the direction of Frikki Walker and the organ was played by Kevin Duggan.

A return visit to Durham Cathedral is in order to explore the building further (when not singing), possibly for one of the photographic evenings.

Organ Casing in the Chancel


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Launch Concert for St Mary’s Organ Appeal – 12 May 2018

The organ in St Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral in Glasgow was originally constructed by William Hill in 1871. When the building became the Cathedral of the United Diocese of Glasgow and Galloway, the organ was rebuilt and enlarged by Harrison and Harrison (in 1909), become one of the largest organs of its kind in Britain. The next two rebuilds by Hill, Norman and Beard in 1967 and 1990.

Organ Casing in the Chancel

Organ Casing in the Chancel
12 May 2018

As part of the 1990 rebuild, fundraising including a Choir Tour singing unaccompanied in all Scottish Episcopal mainland cathedrals in one day. In 2018, the appeal has been launched by a concert showcasing the talents of the Cathedral Choir and the organ, directed by Frikki Walker and accompanied by Steven McIntyre.

Steven McIntyre on the organ stool with Frikki to the right

Steven McIntyre on the organ stool with Frikki to the right
12 May 2018

The organ is in need of a rebuild to deal with not only wear and tear, but some previous work that was not as optimum as it could have been. One other omission is the lack of an organ casing in the South Transept.

View showing the Organ Casing in the Chancel and lack of casing in the South Transept.

View showing the Organ Casing in the Chancel and lack of casing in the South Transept.
13 May 2018

The 1990 rebuild included the provision of a mobile console which could be positioned in the most appropriate place for the service or concert that it was being used for. For this concert it was position in pride on place so that all could see the organ being played.

1990 Movable Console

1990 Movable Console
12 May 2018

The concert also included contributions from two of the choristers on the organ, one singing the solo in Bob Chillcott’s “The Lord is My Shepherd” (Vicar of Dibley theme) and another (who is now studying at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland) conducted the choir for one item.

Concert Flyer

Concert Flyer
12 May 2018

The concert would not be complete without Frikki playing the organ. he played a piece specially commissioned in 2014 by the young composer Piers Connor Kennedy – A Scottish Fancy.

Frikki playing "A Scottish Fancy"

Frikki playing “A Scottish Fancy”
12 May 2018

The appeal is now welcoming donations and over the coming months there will be further activities which will be publicised on the Cathedral Web Site.

Appeal Concert Programme Cover

Appeal Concert Programme Cover
12 May 2018

West End of Peterborough Cathedral


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Peterborough Cathedral – June 2017

Our third cathedral visit in 2017 was to Peterborough. The cathedral precinct is approached via a gateway.

Entrance gateway from within the precinct

Entrance gateway from within the precinct
3 June 2017

The west end is displayed to you as you walk through the gateway.

West End Entrance

West End Entrance
3 June 2017

Passing through the door, the nave altar is seen.

Peterborough Nave Altar

Peterborough Nave Altar
3 June 2017

We had booked the tower tour, so soon after arriving we joined the tour and followed our guide to the north transept. The first part of the tour takes in the walkway around the chancel and behind (and above) the high altar to the south side.

Looking down on the High Altar Canopy

Looking down on the High Altar Canopy
3 June 2017

On the galleries to the north and south are various artefacts, mainly masonry, but also templates of the various pillars and a cupboard with air-raid helmets.

Masonry in the gallery

Masonry in the gallery
3 June 2017

Pillar templates

Pillar templates
3 June 2017

Air Raid Relics

Air Raid Relics
3 June 2017

Retracing our steps to the North Transept, it was another climb to a a higher gallery and to the inside of the tower.

Tower ceiling from ground level

Tower ceiling from ground level
3 June 2017

From the narrow walkway around the inside of the tower, the decoration can be seen at close quarters.

Tower Ceiling Boss

Tower Ceiling Boss
3 June 2017

There was also an opportunity to see the recently restored organ pipework from above.

Peterborough Organ from the tower walkway

Peterborough Organ from the tower walkway
3 June 2017

Looking east, the high altar is also viewed.

High Altar from the Tower Walkway

High Altar from the Tower Walkway
3 June 2017

The tour then headed into the roof space above the North Transept, before coming out unto the roof and the walkway to the top of the tower. From there view across the plains of Cambridgeshire can be seen. Those with a keen eye are able to make out the top of Ely Cathedral.

Looking east towards Ely

Looking east towards Ely
3 June 2017

East End roof from the tower

East End roof from the tower
3 June 2017

Looking south west to the cloisters

Looking south west to the cloisters
3 June 2017

All too soon it was time to come down off the tower, taking the stairs to the nave roof, and walking along the side of the roof to the north west tower where the ringing room is located. Emerging back into the Nave we had a further look around.

High Altar from ground level

High Altar from ground level
3 June 2017

Ceiling above the High Altar

Ceiling above the High Altar
3 June 2017

We then headed to Becket’s Tea Room for a light snack before attending Choral Evensong.

Window in Becket's Tearoom

Window in Becket’s Tearoom
3 June 2017

After Choral Evensong, we spent some time talking to the vergers, who kindly showed us their wands.

Peterborough Cathedral Vergers' Wands

Peterborough Cathedral Vergers’ Wands
3 June 2017

We then went to a local restaurant before getting our train to London. Unfortunately, it was delayed and then diverted due to someone being hit be a train near to Knebworth. Then after getting Northern Line from Kings Cross to London Bridge (we were staying at the London Bridge Hotel) we noted police sirens and blue lights. Although we thought nothing of it very soon afterwards it became evident we were in the middle of a major incident.

Cathedral and Abbey Church of St Alban


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Cathedral and Abbey Church of St Alban – April 2017

The next Cathedral visit in 2017 was to St Albans. Alban was of Roman descent and lived in Verulamium to the south west of the current modern city of St Ablans.

In the third century, Alban, who had recently converted to Christianity, changed clothes with a fugitive priest called Amphibalus and was arrested. Because he refused to sacrifice to the Roman Gods, he was convicted and executed by beheading. The first church on the site is reputed to have been built over Alban’s grave.

The original Saxon Benedictine Abbey dates from the 8th century however plans to rebuild it in the early 11th century came to nothing. After the Norman conquest a new Abbey of the site of the current Cathedral was built. The tower over the crossing built at this time is still standing. The Norman Abbey was completed in 1089.

Inside ceiling of the Tower

Inside ceiling of the Tower
8 April 2017

Over the next 500 years the Abbey had mixed fortunes, including damage resulting from an earthquake in 1250. A few years later parts of the east end that had been damaged were demolished. In 1323 part of the south aisle collapsed taking parts of the roof with it. The biggest change to the Abbey buildings took place as a result of the dissolution of the monasteries following the break from Rome by Henry the VIII. Only the church and the Abby gateway survived. The rest of the buildings were dismantled that the stone used for building elsewhere. The Abbey Gateway is now past of St Albans school.

St Albans Abbey Gateway

St Albans Abbey Gateway
8 April 2017

West End of St Albans Cathedral

West End of St Albans Cathedral
8 April 2017

Entering the west end of the Cathedral, the parish [nave] altar is seen.

Nave of St Albans Cathedral

Nave of St Albans Cathedral
8 April 2018

On the nave screen is a series of statues of martyrs, by Rory Young, installed in 2015 as part of the 900th anniversary of the dedication of the Norman Church in 1115.

Modern Martyrs on the Nave Screen

Modern Martyrs on the Nave Screen
8 April 2017

The martyrs on the screen are St Alban [Britain’s first saint]; St Amphibalus [the Christian priest to whom Alban gave shelter]; George Tankerfield [a Protestant, burnt to death in Romeland]; St Alban Roe [a Roman Catholic, hanged in London in 1642 having been found guilty of treason for being a Roman Catholic priest]; St Elisabeth Romanova [granddaughter of Queen Victoria]; Dietrich Bonhoeffer [Lutheran pastor and theologian]; Oscar Romero [Roman Catholic Archbishop of El Salvador].

On the other side of the nave screen is the Quire and High Altar

Chancel and Organ

Chancel and Organ
8 April 2017

High Altar and Screen

High Altar and Screen
8 April 2017

In the Ramryge Chantry Chapel to the left of the High Altar, the Ramryge Angels are on display. This is their normal location, however I had previously seen them when visited Rochester Cathedral in January 2016.

Ramryge Angels

Ramryge Angels
8 April 2017

Ramryge Angels

Ramryge Angels
8 April 2017

Behind the High Altar is the Shrine to St Alban.

Shrine of St Alban

Shrine of St Alban
8 April 2017

In the north aisle close to St Alban’s Shrine, are the surviving pieces of the shrine constructed to Amphibalus.

Shrine of Amphibalus

Shrine of Amphibalus
8 April 2017

At the east end of the Cathedral is the Lady Chapel.

Lady Chapel

Lady Chapel
8 April 2017

Chelmsford Cathedral


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Chelmsford Cathedral – January 2017

Another of our series of visits to Cathedrals. This time a visit made to Chelmsford Cathedral on 27 January 2017.

East End with Chapter Stalls and Lectern.

East End with Chapter Stalls and Lectern.
27 January 2017

As the church of St Mary the Virgin, the church in Chelmsford dates 1223. In the 15th Century, the church was rebuilt in the Perpendicular style to include the tower, parapets and magnificent South porch. However, due to feuding during the War of the Roses, it took nearly a century to complete.

South Transept

South Transept
27 January 2017

In 1800, whilst work was being undertaken to open out a vault, the nave partially collapsed. The rebuilding was supervised by County architect John Johnson using Coade stone, rather than the flint, stone and brick of the earlier construction.

Chancel from the Nave

Chancel from the Nave
27 January 2017

In 1914, the diocese of Chelmsford was created from parts of the Diocese of St Albans and the church became a Cathedral. There are two organs, one at the west end and the other in the nave. Both can be played from the console in the nave.

West End Organ

West End Organ
27 January 2017

Nave Organ

Nave Organ
27 January 2017

Between the chancel and nave are the pulpit and lectern. The are mirror images of each other.

Pulpit

Pulpit
27 January 2017

Lectern

Lectern
27 January 2017

At the time of our visit, a set of sculptures by the Iranian artist Saloomeh Asgary had just arrived. The six Salvation Sculptures are carved in pine titled ‘Jonah in the Fish’, ‘Motherhood’, ‘Repentance’, ‘Salvation’, ‘Maturing’ and ‘Christ is
Born’. They remained at Chelmsford until 20 February 2017.

Salvation Sculpture: Birth of Jesus

Birth of Jesus
Salvation Sculpture
27 January 2017

Salvation Sculpture: Birth of Jesus

Birth of Jesus
Salvation Sculpture
27 January 2017

On the north side, there is a painting in the style of a window, showing the Tree of Life.

Tree of Life

Tree of Life
27 January 2017

East Window and memorials


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Bothwell Parish Church – 17 February 2018

The Oldest Collegiate Church in Scotland is Bothwell Parish Church. In recent years I have sung Choral Evensong there twice, firstly in September 2016, prior to the completion of the restoration of the Medieval Quire, and then in February 2018 when we sung in the restored Quire.

Bothwell Parish Church

Bothwell Parish Church
10 September 2016

There has been a religious foundation on the site in Bothwell since the 6th century. In the late 14th century the collegiate church was built by the 3rd Earl of Douglas, Archibald the Grim. It was used by Roman Catholic worshippers until the Reformation in 1560.

Medieval Quire seen from the Nave

Medieval Quire seen from the Nave
17 February 2018

From 1667 to 1689, the church followed the jurisdiction of the Episcopal Church, until the the church was proscribed. At that time it became Presbyterian as part of the Church of Scotland, with several ministers subsequently become Moderators of the General Assembly.

The Patron Saint of the church is St Bride, however during the Middle Ages is was dedicated to St Mary. Between 1929 and 1979 the church was St Bride’s, In 1979, the two churches in the village were united under the name of Bothwell Parish Church.

The Medieval [Gothic] Quire was restored, with it being rededicated late in 2016. Either side of the east window there are two memorials to Johanna de Moravia on the left and 4th Earl of Douglas and his wife on the left. The Oak Altar dates from 1898, along with the set of three chairs which is behind it.

High Altar

High Altar
17 February 2018

Around the walls of the nave there are various items in small alcoves containing fragments of the architecture of the original Norman church of Bothwell which was founded in the middle years of the twelfth century.

Alcove with fragements of the Norman Architecture.

Alcove with fragements of the Norman Architecture.
17 February 2018

Bothwell Parish Church has a centre, including the Chapterhouse Cafe, which is open Monday to Saturday.

West End of Christ Church Cathedral.


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Christ Church Cathedral, Victoria – 22 & 24 September 2017

We paid three visits to Christ Church Cathedral in Victoria. Once on 22 September and twice on Sunday 24 September (for morning Eucharist and Choral Evensong). As our accommodation was on Rockland Avenue, it was a simple case of heading downtown along Rockland Avenue to Christ Church Cathedral.

The Main Altar was used for the main service Sunday Eucharist, which was led by the Dean, Margaret Ansley Tucker.

Main Altar

Main Altar
24 September 2017

The current building dates from 1929, however the east end is more recent dating from 1980 when the previous wooden east end wall. The original design for the east end was not followed, and the complex included a chapter house, sacristy, washrooms and other associated rooms. Above the chapter house is the Chapel of New Jerusalem with some magnificent modern stained glass windows at the East End. As you enter the building, these are one of the first thing you see, above and behind the Main Altar.

East End Windows in the Chapel of New Jerusalem.

East End Windows in the Chapel of New Jerusalem.
24 September 2017

Walking into the nave and then looking above the west end door is the main organ and choir balcony, surmounted by the West End Rose Window.

Main Organ and the West End Rose Window.

Main Organ and the West End Rose Window.
22 September 2017

The pulpit was carved from a single piece of oak imported from England. At 500 years old when felled, the wood was seasoned for 30 years before being carved. The three coats of arms on the panel are, from left, those of the Dioceses of Canterbury and British Columbia and those of the family who donated the pulpit. On the vertical panel supporting the canopy is the coat of arms of the Cathedral.

The Pulpit of Christ Church Cathedral, Victoria.

The Pulpit of Christ Church Cathedral, Victoria.
24 September 2017

To the south of the Main Altar is the Chapel to St Christopher where Choral Evensong was sung. The east end of the chapel is an organ, although the Choral Evensong we attended was accompanied by a chamber organ and sung by the St Christopher Singers.

St Christopher Chapel and organ.

St Christopher Chapel and organ.
24 September 2017

The west end of the church is on Quadra Street.

West End of Christ Church Cathedral and Quadra Street.

West End of Christ Church Cathedral and Quadra Street.
24 September 2017

North of the cathedral across Rockland Avenue and also on Quadra Street is Pioneer Square, which is an old burying ground of Victoria. This was the main cemetery to Victoria from 1855 to 1873. The southwest corner feature Naval graves as ship’s crew felt their colleagues should be appropriately remembered.

View of Sky Pilot Mountain from the Spirit Trail Viewing Point


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That was 2017

2017 was a mixed year regarding posting here. The highlight of the year was our trip to British Columbia in September, however the low point was the sad loss of our Red Tabby, Cosmo.

As well as regular visits to St Mary’s Cathedral in Glasgow, Glasgow Cathedral (The High Kirk) and Southwark Cathedral, visits were also made to five other Cathedrals – two in Canada. Although a lot of pictures were taken some have yet to find their way onto the on-line gallery, especially St Albans Cathedral.

The year started with friends visiting from Lancashire, and so on January 2 we undertook a day trip to Edinburgh.

One O'Clock Gun at Edinburgh Castle

One O’Clock Gun at Edinburgh Castle
2 January 2017

January 2017
Whilst postings were chronicling our holiday in Whitby during September 2016, the highlight of the month was a visit to London at the end of the month. This included a trip to Chelmsford Cathedral.

Chelmsford Cathedral

Chelmsford Cathedral
27 January 2017

This was not our only church visit, which also included Corpus Christi at Covent Garden

Pictures from the month

February 2017
February was mild and the garden started to emerge from its winter hibernation.

Emerging Rhubarb

Emerging Rhubarb
26 February 2017

It was also a quiet month for the camera, with few pictures taken.

March 2017
With the month being warmer, street entertainment was evident in Glasgow, including this group – Rollin’ Dromes.

Rollin' Drones in Buchanan Street

Rollin’ Drones in Buchanan Street
25 March 2017

There was also an opportunity to let Cosmo out into the garden.

Pictures from the month

April 2017
April as well including Easter, heralded the first visit of the year to Porthmadog. On Palm Sunday weekend, we visited St Albans Cathedral on a sunny afternoon.

West End of St Albans Cathedral

West End of St Albans Cathedral
8 April 2017

As with all trips to Porthmadog, the current window display at Glosters was captures.

Selected Pictures from the month

May 2017
May featured a concert at Glasgow Cathedral. Considering where the performers were located, there was a new location for the camera on the ledge in front of the West End doors. After the service there was still residual light after sunset.

Glasgow Cathedral at Dusk

Glasgow Cathedral at Dusk
27 May 2017

Selected Pictures from the month

June 2017
On the first weekend of June we visited London, including a day trip to Peterborough to visit the cathedral.

West End of Peterborough Cathedral

West End of Peterborough Cathedral
3 June 2017

The journey back to London was not without its challenges. Due to a person being hit by a train near Welwyn Garden City, the train was diverted resulting in us not getting back to our hotel a lot later than expected. However on arriving back at the London Bridge Hotel (where we were staying) there was a lot of police activity. Due to social media and 24 hours news coverage we discovered that we were in the middle of the aftermath of the London Bridge incident were a van was driven into various people. We wrote more about this in the blog.

Later in the month featured visiting Dundee with GCCS to record a CD and another visit to North Wales.

Pictures from the Month

July 2017
Our walk to Stwlan Dam on 29 June was abandoned due to bad weather, however whilst on our way home we saw it from the south.

Stwlan Dam

Stwlan Dam
1 July 2017

Due to work commitments there were rare opportunities to take pictures during July.

August 2017
Later in the month Cosmo started to suffer from poor health, and although we did not know it at the time this was one of the last pictures we took of him.

Cosmo on the garden bench

Cosmo on the garden bench
10 August 2017

There was another trip to North Wales and the Ffestiniog & Welsh Highland Railways, including more pictures of the Glosters window. A sunny day enabled a walk to Stwlan Dam, and at the end of the month the Manchester Cathedral Voluntary Choir visited Paisley and Glasgow.

Pictures from the Month

September 2017
Sadly at the end of August Cosmo, our Red Tabby became ill and after a short illness passed away in early September.

At the end of the month we visit Vancouver and Victoria for two weeks. Many pictures were taken and many blogs are being written.

Water Taxis in Victoria Harbour.

Water Taxis in Victoria Harbour.
28 September 2017

Pictures from the Month

October 2017
The final trip to Porthmadog for 2017, and another Glosters window to capture.

Halloween Window display at Glosters

Halloween Window display at Glosters
31 October 2017

In October, the travelogue of the British Columbia holiday in September was started. This was still ongoing at the end of 2017, and will continue into 2018.

Pictures from the Month

November 2017
Poppet, a chocolate British Shorthair Tabby joined us during the month

Poppet

Poppet
14 November 2017

As well as Poppet, we received a cermics delivery from Glosters and a friend took up a honorary post at St Mary’s Cathedral.

Pictures from the Month

December 2017
With the 24 December being a Sunday, there was combination of Advent 4 in the morning and Christmas Eve, with Crib Service and Carol Service, at St Mary’s.

Before the Carol Service at St Mary's

Before the Carol Service at St Mary’s
24 December 2017

Pictures from the Month

Both Cosmo and Poppet had Facebook pages created for them during the year:

And so the roundup of the year finishes with a memory of Cosmo in the Garden during the summer, and a pose from Poppet in the dishwasher, yes the dishwasher as she decided to help emptying it.

Cosmo & Poppet

Cosmo in the Garden – 25 July 2017
Poppet in the Dishwasher – 30 December 2017

Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver


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Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver – 17 September 2017

Our first full day in Vancouver was a Sunday. We had decided to visit Christ Church Cathedral for their Sunday morning service.

It is the cathedral church of the Anglican Diocese of New Westminster, part of the Anglican Church of Canada, having become the cathedral of the diocese in 1929. The building is older, having started with the basement in 1889, and further development in the early 20th century. In the 1970s the congregation voted to demolish the building and have it replaced by a high rise complex. After public campaigning this did not happen. In 1995 an eleven year restoration programme was embarked upon.

Christ Church Cathedral is in downtown Vancouver on the corner of Burrard and West Georgia. This meant that parking was going to be a challenge, however a visit to their web site provided a solution as they have an arrangement with a car park in the same block, requiring us to print out a parking pass before we left home. So at around 10am we had negotiated our way into the Park Place Parkade and left the car park with the pass on display.

Christ Church Cathedral is orientated north-east / south-west, with the main door on west corner. Our walk to the door took us past a water feature.

Water feature on the north piazza

Water feature on the north piazza
17 September 2017

Main Entrance of Christ Church Cathedral

Main Entrance of Christ Church Cathedral
17 September 2017

Inside the building we were warmly welcomed. As we took our seats, we noted that over the entrance is the organ and choir stalls.

Christ Church Cathedral Organ

Christ Church Cathedral Organ
17 September 2017

The service started with the notices. The liturgy followed a format we were familiar with, even if some of the words were slightly different. It was led by the Dean, Peter Elliot, who we spoke to afterwards.

Dean Peter Elliott after Morning Service

Dean Peter Elliott after Morning Service
17 September 2017

The building includes many fine features including lanterns that were installed in the 1930s.

1930s Lanterns

1930s Lanterns
17 September 2017

There is a triptych of paintings at the north-east end.

Paintings at North-East end

Paintings at North-East end
17 September 2017

All around the building is stained glass

North East Window

North East Window
17 September 2017

Window on north-west side

Window on north-west side
17 September 2017

After the service we had a look around and noted the template on the credence table for all the vessels used during communion.

Credence Table Template

Credence Table Template
17 September 2017

After the service we went downstairs for refreshments – tea or coffee. Cake was being served as well. There was a welcome banner on display.

Christ Church Cathedral Welcome Banner

Christ Church Cathedral Welcome Banner
17 September 2017

We felt at home at Christ Church Cathedral, and will definitely go again, next time we are in Vancouver.


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He was Crucified

After being arrested, the Innocent Man, was tried and condemned to death: in the ongoing saga breaking over the last 24 hours of the innocent man arrested, it has been confirmed that the region’s Governor has found him Not Guilty of any crime. However following pressure put on him by the local leaders, and fearing a local uprising, the Governor has agreed to have the Innocent Man crucified to pacify the locals. He has also released a petty sneak thief in a further pacification move that has left many bewildered. The Governor has made it clear he does not believe the man is guilt but has had the Innocent Man whipped with a lead tipped whip before handing him over for his execution which shall begin at 12pm today.

He was Crucified

He was Crucified

[Credit to Chris Hoskins for the inspiration from his facebook postings during the Triidium in 2015]