Random thoughts from Pencefn

…. an engineer, singer and photographer living in Scotland


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He was Crucified

After being arrested, the Innocent Man, was tried and condemned to death: in the ongoing saga breaking over the last 24 hours of the innocent man arrested, it has been confirmed that the region’s Governor has found him Not Guilty of any crime. However following pressure put on him by the local leaders, and fearing a local uprising, the Governor has agreed to have the Innocent Man crucified to pacify the locals. He has also released a petty sneak thief in a further pacification move that has left many bewildered. The Governor has made it clear he does not believe the man is guilt but has had the Innocent Man whipped with a lead tipped whip before handing him over for his execution which shall begin at 12pm today.

He was Crucified

He was Crucified

[Credit to Chris Hoskins for the inspiration from his facebook postings during the Triidium in 2015]


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He was Betrayed

A group of friends went to the garden in the evening. One, an innocent man, went a little way off to meditate. The rest could not stay awake. He came back and woke them, rebuking them for sleeping.

Gethsemane

Gethsemane

One of the friends was not there, he was to betray his friend. The Betrayer came with a crowd, armed with weapons, from the elders to have the Innocent Man arrested.

Gethsemane

Gethsemane

The Betrayer kissed the Innocent Man who was then arrested.

The rest of the friends fled.

[Credit to Chris Hoskins for the inspiration from his facebook postings during the Triidium in 2015]

Fountains Abbey from the east


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Fountains Abbey – 20 September 2016

Founded in 1132, Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved of the ruined abbeys in the United Kingdom. The Cisterian foundation operated for around 400 years until the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII.

Fountains Abbey from the south west

Fountains Abbey from the south west
20 September 2016

The abbey complex is located in the valley of the River Skell which cuts across the site, with some of the building spanning the river.

River Skell running through the Abbey complex

River Skell running through the Abbey complex
20 September 2016

The foundation started following a riot in the Benedictine House of St Mary’s Abbey in York in 1132. Some fo the monks were expelled and were taken under the care of the then Archbishop of York (Thurstan) who gave the land as it was ideal for the development of a monastic community, with the river and local topography providing shelter. Natural resources where available is the shape of timber and stone for building. Following the winter of 1133, the monks applied to join the Cistercian order. They were successful becoming the second Abbey in the North Yorkshire to follow the order after Rievaulx.

Walking around the ruins, many features are still discernable.

Undercroft below the Great Cloister

Undercroft below the Great Cloister
20 September 2016

Immediately underneath the great East Window, with the mullions no longer present is the centre section (three altars) or the Chapel of Nine Altars. The base of the High Altar is slightly further west.

East Window

East Window
20 September 2016

Part of the chapel of Nine Altars

Southern third of the chapel of Nine Altars
20 September 2016

Looking west from below the west window the High Altar is in front of you with the Nave stretching away

High Altar, Chancel and Nave

High Altar, Chancel and Nave
20 September 2016

As with many Abbeys, a tower was built which still stands basically intact.

The Tower of Fountains Abbey

The Tower of Fountains Abbey
20 September 2016

The abbey thrived with many endowments, even surviving the looting of Northern England by the Scots after the Battle of Bannckburn. In 1539, the Abbey was surrendered to The Crown following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. It was subsequently sold on to a London Merchant in 1540, who dismantled part of the complex to sell materials (timber, stone, lead) to offset to cost of the purchase.

In the 18th century it became part of the Studley Royal Estate. In 1966 the Abbbey came under the guardianship of the country, being managed by the National Trust since 1983.

In 1986, the Abbey and associate parkland was designated a World Heritage site by UNESCO.

The eastern aspect of Fountains Abbey

The eastern aspect of Fountains Abbey
20 September 2016

Mount Grace Priory


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Mount Grace Priory – 20 September 2016

At the end of the 14th century, Thomas Holland, 1st Duke of Surrey founded the Carthusian house of Mount Grace Priory.

Mount Grace Priory church from the cloister

Mount Grace Priory church from the cloister
20 September 2016

There is a small church at the centre of the enclave. The tower (added in 1420) and some of the walls still stand, whilst the outline is clear to follow. A feature of the ruin is a recent statue of the Virgin Mary holding the Christ Child in the form of a cross, which combines the symbolism of the birth and crucifixion. The artist, Malcom Brocklesby, title this Madonna and Child when it was made in 1996.

Madonna and Child by Malcom Brocklesby

Madonna and Child by Malcom Brocklesby
20 Spetember 2016

As we found later in the date there is another depiction of this statue in Ripon Cathedral.

Unlike the Monastic foundations at Fountains, Bylands, Rivealux and Whitby (all visited later in our holiday), the Carthusian monks lived alone in individual cells around the Great Cloister, to the north of the church. They only ventured out to attend services in the church. This does mean that although the Priory has a large footprint there were few monks in residence (around 20 to 25).

Plan of Mount Grace Priory

Plan of Mount Grace Priory
20 September 2016

In their cells the monks slept, engaged in private prayer and meditation, work (e.g. weaving) and had a small garden. Cell 8 has been restored to give the visitor an impression of how the monks lived. As you enter, there is a small hatchway by the door for the monk to receive his meals, with an angle in it such that there is no direct line of sight through it.

Entrance to Cell 8

Entrance to Cell 8
20 September 2016

Downstairs there are two rooms:

A bedroom with a prayer desk

Bedroom in Cell 8

Bedroom in Cell 8
20 September 2017

A study with a table

Study in Cell 8

Study in Cell 8
20 September 2016

Upstairs there is one big room, which (in Cell 8) house a loom and other work areas.

Upstairs Workroom in Cell 8

Upstairs Workroom in Cell 8
20 September 2016

Going outside of the cell there is a covered walkway to the latrine and an enclosed garden that the monk would tend.

Garden of Cell 8

Garden of Cell 8
20 September 2017

Following the dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII, the Guest House remained intact until substantially altered by Lord Darcy [of Mount Grace] in the mid 17th century.

Mount Grace Priory Guest House

Mount Grace Priory Guest House
20 September 2016

The residence and the ruins passed through various hands until the 1950s when it was given to the state in lieu of death duties and put into the care of the National Trust, who entrust the management of the property to English Heritage.

Murals in the Nave


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St Peter & St Paul Parish Church, Pickering – 19 September 2016

Having arrived in Pickering via the North Yorkshire Moors Railway (NYMR), we went for a walk around Pickering and visited the Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul.

Porch and Tower

Porch and Tower
19 September 2016

Walking into the building, the medieval murals on the nave walls are one of the first things that are seen. Looking east, the chancel, high altar and east window are seen through the screen.

Chancel and High Altar

Chancel and High Altar
19 September 2016

The murals were painted in the 15th century and feature St George, St Christopher and various scenes from the bible.

Bible Scenes on the medieval murals

Bible Scenes on the medieval murals
19 September 2016

Within 100 years the murals were painted over. In 1852, they were accidentally uncovered. They were not to the liking of the vicar so they were covered up again. More recently they have been uncovered and restored. If you visit the church for no other reason, the murals are a delight to view.

Information Board in Market Street

Information Board in Market Street
19 September 2016

So if you are visiting North Yorkshire, you can either drive, or as we did take the NYMR train from the coast at Whitby, and the church can be found at the top of Market Place. You may even experience the market as we did on the day of our visit.


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Whitby 2016 – Sunday Morning at St Bartholomew’s Ruswarp

Our first full day in North Yorkshire was a Sunday, so we sought out the local church. Although it only had a Sunday service once a month, we were fortunate it was that particular Sunday.

St Bartholomew’s is part of a benefice which includes three churches in Whitby (St Mary the Virgin, St Hilda and St John the Evangelist). There are a number of clergy serving this benefice. We were to visit St Mary the Virgin and St Hilda’s later in our holiday.

Situated in the centre of the village by the river Esk and the railway level crossing, the church was a short walk from our accommodation.

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Parish Church of St Bartholomew, Ruswarp
18 September 2016

Entering the church the chancel caught our eye, the inscription on the beam at the entrance to the chancel and the ceiling over the high altar.

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Chancel of St Bartholomew’s Church
18 September 2016

Although the nave was laid out for a reasonable sized congregation (we estimated at around 120). The capacity has been reduced with a circulating area created at the west end where there is a small kitchen and tables.

The Sunday service took place in a side chapel with 16 seats.

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Altar and Stained Glass Window in side Chapel
18 September 2016

The congregation numbered 10, and it was the first time the then new Vicar in charge of the benefice had take a Sunday service at St Bartholomew’s.

One feature of the building is the number of carvings of mice on the woodwork and a cat. It took a little while to search them all out. These can be seen in the linked photo album.

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The cat on the font
18 September 2016

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The mouse on the pulpit
18 September 2016

 

Communion Table and Aspe at East End


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Parish Church of St Cuthbert, Edinburgh – 8 October 2016

After a short break, the blog returns with a visit to the Parish Church of St Cuthbert in Edinburgh.

Located at the end of Lothian Road, next to St John’s Episcopal Church, this church is at the west end of Princes Street gardens under Edinburgh Castle.

East End of St Cuthberts. Edinburgh

East End of St Cuthberts. Edinburgh
8 October 2016

There have been several buildings on the site. The early ones were on the shores of the Nor’Loch (which was drained and filled in during the 19th century when the railway was constructed). The current building was designed by Hippolyte Blanc and opened in 1894.

One of the features of the building is the pulpit. Under the pulpit is the foundation stone and a time capsule with 1890’s items.

The Pulpit

The Pulpit
8 October 2016

At the East End is the Apse with a painted ceiling by Robert Hope RSA. The centre panel features Christ, being worshiped by angels on either side.

Apse ceiling

Apse ceiling
8 October 2016

The font is provided with a bronze statue on its cover. This is a copy of Michaelangelo’s statue in the Church of Our Lady in Bruges.

Font Cover

Font Cover
8 October 2016

The organ was built in 1899 by Robert Hope-Jones of Birkenhead, and having been rebuilt several times, the current setup dates from 1997/8 when it was rebuilt by Walker & Sons. The four manual console is located in the south gallery of the chancel opposite the chancel organ case in the north chancel. The majority of the pipes are located in the North Gallery.

North Gallery Organ Loft

North Gallery Organ Loft
8 October 2016

Crosshouse Parish Church


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Crosshouse Parish Church – 11 June 2016

Those of you who live in (or know of) West Central Scotland may know about the large general hospital at Kilmarnock. Crosshouse Hospital takes it name from the adjacent village.

In 1882, Crosshouse Parish Church was built to service the mining village of the same name.

Main Door of Crosshouse Parish Church

Main Door of Crosshouse Parish Church
11 June 2016

The movement to build a church in Crosshouse started in 1879, with a committee of 19, chaired by the Rev Alexander Inglis. By early 1880 subscriptions had raised just over £400. In July 1880, Lady Harriet Scott Bentnick (daughter of the 4th Duke of Portland), gave the land for the church and manse for a feu of 5/- (25p) per year and donated £100 to the building fund. With £600 from the Baird Trust and £700 from the Ferguson Trust, the inital estimated cost of £1,770 had been reached. A further £250 was estimated for boundary wall and heating in the building. The foundation stone was laid in 1881. The church was opened for public worship on Sunday 19 March 1882. The accounts for the building at the 1882 amounted to just over £2,755.

From the road the leads to Kilmarnock (and the hospital), the church is prominent with a war memorial in front. To the east is the manse, which was completed in 1887.

South face of Crosshouse Parish Church

South face of Crosshouse Parish Church
11 June 2016

Entering the church, the organ and rose window are featured at the north end of the nave.

The nave looking to the Organ and north rose window.

The nave looking to the Organ and north rose window.
11 June 2016

The original communion table is now used elsewhere in the building, following the gift by the late Elizabeth Well in 1980.

The Elizabeth Well Communion Table

The Elizabeth Well Communion Table
11 June 2016

Provision had been made in the construction of a gallery, to seat 100 people at the south end of the building. This can be seen by the arrangement of the south window, leaving blank wall were the gallery would have been located.

South Window

South Window
11 June 2016

The baptismal font was made out of marble and presented to the congregation by Mr Pollock Morris.

Marble Font

Marble Font
11 June 2016

A legacy was received from his estate in 1901, which was used to install an organ in the building, located under the North Rose Window.

Dunblane Cathedral


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Dunblane Cathedral – 14 May 2016

This was my first visit to the ancient Dunblane Cathedral. As with many religious establishments around and over 1000 years, there are parts which go back to the original construction, including the bell tower which was built as a freestanding structure in the 1100s. However the first religious community was founded by St Blane in the 7th century.

The basis of the current building was founded by Bishop Clement in the 13th century. Papal approval to build the cathedral was granted in 1237. However after the Reformation of 1560 the building fell into dis-repair. In the Victoria era, the restoration was undertaken by Robert Anderson, which secured the building at it currently exists.

Dunblane Cathedral

Dunblane Cathedral
14 May 2016

Bishop Clement incorporated the 12th century tower into his building. His successor, Bishop Chisholm, increased the height between 1487 and 1526. The differing dressed stone shows this extension to this day.

Most of the Nave as it is seen today dates from the Anderson restoration as the Reformation destroyed many of the chapels, and the stonework would have been plastered and brightly coloured.

West Window of Dunblane Cathedral

West Window of Dunblane Cathedral
14 May 2016

The screen into the Chancel dates from the 1880s. Part of the original screen still exists and is on display in the Dunblane museum. Behind the communion table is the east window, however this had been designed for the south side. As plans for the construction of the building changed, it was determined that the windows in the south side needed to be larger and the panes were installed in the east end.

East Window of Dunblane Cathedral

East Window of Dunblane Cathedral
14 May 2016

To get a elevated view of the nave looking east, it is possible to climd the spiral stairs to the walkway in front of the west window.

View from the West Window

View from the West Window
14 May 2016

One of the newest items in the cathedral is the organ. The present organ in Dunblane Cathedral was built by Flentrop of Zaandam in the Netherlands in 1990. Unlike many organs it does not have any pistons to allow the organist to select groups of stops of the change the mood/volume/tone of the music en mass. The organist (or their page turner) have to select their stops individually.

Organ Console of Dunblane Cathedral

Organ Console of Dunblane Cathedral
14 May 2016

Since 1888, the building has been looked after by the state, and is in the care of Historic Scotland. It is well worth a visit, being a short walk from Dunblane railway station which is well served from the Central belt of Scotland.

East End Window


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High Kirk of Glasgow – 19 & 21 May 2016

Otherwise known as Glasgow Cathedral, the building dates from the late 12th centrury. Dedicated to St Mungo, the tomb of the saint is located in the crypt.

West End Elevation

West End Elevation
21 May 2016

My visits on 19 & 21 May 2016 were for the rehearsal and performance of choral works with Glasgow Cathedral Choral Society. This did mean that photographic opportunities and a more comprehensive look at the building was not possible.

The West End features a rose window at the top of the building.

West End Window

West End Window
19 May 2016

In the Chancel, there are painted bosses.

Painted boss in Chancel ceiling

Painted boss in Chancel ceiling
19 May 2016

This taster means that I must arrange to visit the building and its environs for a more comprehensive look at the building.