Random thoughts from Pencefn

…. an engineer, singer and photographer living in Scotland

West End of Christ Church Cathedral.


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Christ Church Cathedral, Victoria – 22 & 24 September 2017

We paid three visits to Christ Church Cathedral in Victoria. Once on 22 September and twice on Sunday 24 September (for morning Eucharist and Choral Evensong). As our accommodation was on Rockland Avenue, it was a simple case of heading downtown along Rockland Avenue to Christ Church Cathedral.

The Main Altar was used for the main service Sunday Eucharist, which was led by the Dean, Margaret Ansley Tucker.

Main Altar

Main Altar
24 September 2017

The current building dates from 1929, however the east end is more recent dating from 1980 when the previous wooden east end wall. The original design for the east end was not followed, and the complex included a chapter house, sacristy, washrooms and other associated rooms. Above the chapter house is the Chapel of New Jerusalem with some magnificent modern stained glass windows at the East End. As you enter the building, these are one of the first thing you see, above and behind the Main Altar.

East End Windows in the Chapel of New Jerusalem.

East End Windows in the Chapel of New Jerusalem.
24 September 2017

Walking into the nave and then looking above the west end door is the main organ and choir balcony, surmounted by the West End Rose Window.

Main Organ and the West End Rose Window.

Main Organ and the West End Rose Window.
22 September 2017

The pulpit was carved from a single piece of oak imported from England. At 500 years old when felled, the wood was seasoned for 30 years before being carved. The three coats of arms on the panel are, from left, those of the Dioceses of Canterbury and British Columbia and those of the family who donated the pulpit. On the vertical panel supporting the canopy is the coat of arms of the Cathedral.

The Pulpit of Christ Church Cathedral, Victoria.

The Pulpit of Christ Church Cathedral, Victoria.
24 September 2017

To the south of the Main Altar is the Chapel to St Christopher where Choral Evensong was sung. The east end of the chapel is an organ, although the Choral Evensong we attended was accompanied by a chamber organ and sung by the St Christopher Singers.

St Christopher Chapel and organ.

St Christopher Chapel and organ.
24 September 2017

The west end of the church is on Quadra Street.

West End of Christ Church Cathedral and Quadra Street.

West End of Christ Church Cathedral and Quadra Street.
24 September 2017

North of the cathedral across Rockland Avenue and also on Quadra Street is Pioneer Square, which is an old burying ground of Victoria. This was the main cemetery to Victoria from 1855 to 1873. The southwest corner feature Naval graves as ship’s crew felt their colleagues should be appropriately remembered.

View of Sky Pilot Mountain from the Spirit Trail Viewing Point


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That was 2017

2017 was a mixed year regarding posting here. The highlight of the year was our trip to British Columbia in September, however the low point was the sad loss of our Red Tabby, Cosmo.

As well as regular visits to St Mary’s Cathedral in Glasgow, Glasgow Cathedral (The High Kirk) and Southwark Cathedral, visits were also made to five other Cathedrals – two in Canada. Although a lot of pictures were taken some have yet to find their way onto the on-line gallery, especially St Albans Cathedral.

The year started with friends visiting from Lancashire, and so on January 2 we undertook a day trip to Edinburgh.

One O'Clock Gun at Edinburgh Castle

One O’Clock Gun at Edinburgh Castle
2 January 2017

January 2017
Whilst postings were chronicling our holiday in Whitby during September 2016, the highlight of the month was a visit to London at the end of the month. This included a trip to Chelmsford Cathedral.

Chelmsford Cathedral

Chelmsford Cathedral
27 January 2017

This was not our only church visit, which also included Corpus Christi at Covent Garden

Pictures from the month

February 2017
February was mild and the garden started to emerge from its winter hibernation.

Emerging Rhubarb

Emerging Rhubarb
26 February 2017

It was also a quiet month for the camera, with few pictures taken.

March 2017
With the month being warmer, street entertainment was evident in Glasgow, including this group – Rollin’ Dromes.

Rollin' Drones in Buchanan Street

Rollin’ Drones in Buchanan Street
25 March 2017

There was also an opportunity to let Cosmo out into the garden.

Pictures from the month

April 2017
April as well including Easter, heralded the first visit of the year to Porthmadog. On Palm Sunday weekend, we visited St Albans Cathedral on a sunny afternoon.

West End of St Albans Cathedral

West End of St Albans Cathedral
8 April 2017

As with all trips to Porthmadog, the current window display at Glosters was captures.

Selected Pictures from the month

May 2017
May featured a concert at Glasgow Cathedral. Considering where the performers were located, there was a new location for the camera on the ledge in front of the West End doors. After the service there was still residual light after sunset.

Glasgow Cathedral at Dusk

Glasgow Cathedral at Dusk
27 May 2017

Selected Pictures from the month

June 2017
On the first weekend of June we visited London, including a day trip to Peterborough to visit the cathedral.

West End of Peterborough Cathedral

West End of Peterborough Cathedral
3 June 2017

The journey back to London was not without its challenges. Due to a person being hit by a train near Welwyn Garden City, the train was diverted resulting in us not getting back to our hotel a lot later than expected. However on arriving back at the London Bridge Hotel (where we were staying) there was a lot of police activity. Due to social media and 24 hours news coverage we discovered that we were in the middle of the aftermath of the London Bridge incident were a van was driven into various people. We wrote more about this in the blog.

Later in the month featured visiting Dundee with GCCS to record a CD and another visit to North Wales.

Pictures from the Month

July 2017
Our walk to Stwlan Dam on 29 June was abandoned due to bad weather, however whilst on our way home we saw it from the south.

Stwlan Dam

Stwlan Dam
1 July 2017

Due to work commitments there were rare opportunities to take pictures during July.

August 2017
Later in the month Cosmo started to suffer from poor health, and although we did not know it at the time this was one of the last pictures we took of him.

Cosmo on the garden bench

Cosmo on the garden bench
10 August 2017

There was another trip to North Wales and the Ffestiniog & Welsh Highland Railways, including more pictures of the Glosters window. A sunny day enabled a walk to Stwlan Dam, and at the end of the month the Manchester Cathedral Voluntary Choir visited Paisley and Glasgow.

Pictures from the Month

September 2017
Sadly at the end of August Cosmo, our Red Tabby became ill and after a short illness passed away in early September.

At the end of the month we visit Vancouver and Victoria for two weeks. Many pictures were taken and many blogs are being written.

Water Taxis in Victoria Harbour.

Water Taxis in Victoria Harbour.
28 September 2017

Pictures from the Month

October 2017
The final trip to Porthmadog for 2017, and another Glosters window to capture.

Halloween Window display at Glosters

Halloween Window display at Glosters
31 October 2017

In October, the travelogue of the British Columbia holiday in September was started. This was still ongoing at the end of 2017, and will continue into 2018.

Pictures from the Month

November 2017
Poppet, a chocolate British Shorthair Tabby joined us during the month

Poppet

Poppet
14 November 2017

As well as Poppet, we received a cermics delivery from Glosters and a friend took up a honorary post at St Mary’s Cathedral.

Pictures from the Month

December 2017
With the 24 December being a Sunday, there was combination of Advent 4 in the morning and Christmas Eve, with Crib Service and Carol Service, at St Mary’s.

Before the Carol Service at St Mary's

Before the Carol Service at St Mary’s
24 December 2017

Pictures from the Month

Both Cosmo and Poppet had Facebook pages created for them during the year:

And so the roundup of the year finishes with a memory of Cosmo in the Garden during the summer, and a pose from Poppet in the dishwasher, yes the dishwasher as she decided to help emptying it.

Cosmo & Poppet

Cosmo in the Garden – 25 July 2017
Poppet in the Dishwasher – 30 December 2017

Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver


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Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver – 17 September 2017

Our first full day in Vancouver was a Sunday. We had decided to visit Christ Church Cathedral for their Sunday morning service.

It is the cathedral church of the Anglican Diocese of New Westminster, part of the Anglican Church of Canada, having become the cathedral of the diocese in 1929. The building is older, having started with the basement in 1889, and further development in the early 20th century. In the 1970s the congregation voted to demolish the building and have it replaced by a high rise complex. After public campaigning this did not happen. In 1995 an eleven year restoration programme was embarked upon.

Christ Church Cathedral is in downtown Vancouver on the corner of Burrard and West Georgia. This meant that parking was going to be a challenge, however a visit to their web site provided a solution as they have an arrangement with a car park in the same block, requiring us to print out a parking pass before we left home. So at around 10am we had negotiated our way into the Park Place Parkade and left the car park with the pass on display.

Christ Church Cathedral is orientated north-east / south-west, with the main door on west corner. Our walk to the door took us past a water feature.

Water feature on the north piazza

Water feature on the north piazza
17 September 2017

Main Entrance of Christ Church Cathedral

Main Entrance of Christ Church Cathedral
17 September 2017

Inside the building we were warmly welcomed. As we took our seats, we noted that over the entrance is the organ and choir stalls.

Christ Church Cathedral Organ

Christ Church Cathedral Organ
17 September 2017

The service started with the notices. The liturgy followed a format we were familiar with, even if some of the words were slightly different. It was led by the Dean, Peter Elliot, who we spoke to afterwards.

Dean Peter Elliott after Morning Service

Dean Peter Elliott after Morning Service
17 September 2017

The building includes many fine features including lanterns that were installed in the 1930s.

1930s Lanterns

1930s Lanterns
17 September 2017

There is a triptych of paintings at the north-east end.

Paintings at North-East end

Paintings at North-East end
17 September 2017

All around the building is stained glass

North East Window

North East Window
17 September 2017

Window on north-west side

Window on north-west side
17 September 2017

After the service we had a look around and noted the template on the credence table for all the vessels used during communion.

Credence Table Template

Credence Table Template
17 September 2017

After the service we went downstairs for refreshments – tea or coffee. Cake was being served as well. There was a welcome banner on display.

Christ Church Cathedral Welcome Banner

Christ Church Cathedral Welcome Banner
17 September 2017

We felt at home at Christ Church Cathedral, and will definitely go again, next time we are in Vancouver.


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He was Crucified

After being arrested, the Innocent Man, was tried and condemned to death: in the ongoing saga breaking over the last 24 hours of the innocent man arrested, it has been confirmed that the region’s Governor has found him Not Guilty of any crime. However following pressure put on him by the local leaders, and fearing a local uprising, the Governor has agreed to have the Innocent Man crucified to pacify the locals. He has also released a petty sneak thief in a further pacification move that has left many bewildered. The Governor has made it clear he does not believe the man is guilt but has had the Innocent Man whipped with a lead tipped whip before handing him over for his execution which shall begin at 12pm today.

He was Crucified

He was Crucified

[Credit to Chris Hoskins for the inspiration from his facebook postings during the Triidium in 2015]


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He was Betrayed

A group of friends went to the garden in the evening. One, an innocent man, went a little way off to meditate. The rest could not stay awake. He came back and woke them, rebuking them for sleeping.

Gethsemane

Gethsemane

One of the friends was not there, he was to betray his friend. The Betrayer came with a crowd, armed with weapons, from the elders to have the Innocent Man arrested.

Gethsemane

Gethsemane

The Betrayer kissed the Innocent Man who was then arrested.

The rest of the friends fled.

[Credit to Chris Hoskins for the inspiration from his facebook postings during the Triidium in 2015]

Fountains Abbey from the east


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Fountains Abbey – 20 September 2016

Founded in 1132, Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved of the ruined abbeys in the United Kingdom. The Cisterian foundation operated for around 400 years until the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII.

Fountains Abbey from the south west

Fountains Abbey from the south west
20 September 2016

The abbey complex is located in the valley of the River Skell which cuts across the site, with some of the building spanning the river.

River Skell running through the Abbey complex

River Skell running through the Abbey complex
20 September 2016

The foundation started following a riot in the Benedictine House of St Mary’s Abbey in York in 1132. Some fo the monks were expelled and were taken under the care of the then Archbishop of York (Thurstan) who gave the land as it was ideal for the development of a monastic community, with the river and local topography providing shelter. Natural resources where available is the shape of timber and stone for building. Following the winter of 1133, the monks applied to join the Cistercian order. They were successful becoming the second Abbey in the North Yorkshire to follow the order after Rievaulx.

Walking around the ruins, many features are still discernable.

Undercroft below the Great Cloister

Undercroft below the Great Cloister
20 September 2016

Immediately underneath the great East Window, with the mullions no longer present is the centre section (three altars) or the Chapel of Nine Altars. The base of the High Altar is slightly further west.

East Window

East Window
20 September 2016

Part of the chapel of Nine Altars

Southern third of the chapel of Nine Altars
20 September 2016

Looking west from below the west window the High Altar is in front of you with the Nave stretching away

High Altar, Chancel and Nave

High Altar, Chancel and Nave
20 September 2016

As with many Abbeys, a tower was built which still stands basically intact.

The Tower of Fountains Abbey

The Tower of Fountains Abbey
20 September 2016

The abbey thrived with many endowments, even surviving the looting of Northern England by the Scots after the Battle of Bannckburn. In 1539, the Abbey was surrendered to The Crown following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. It was subsequently sold on to a London Merchant in 1540, who dismantled part of the complex to sell materials (timber, stone, lead) to offset to cost of the purchase.

In the 18th century it became part of the Studley Royal Estate. In 1966 the Abbbey came under the guardianship of the country, being managed by the National Trust since 1983.

In 1986, the Abbey and associate parkland was designated a World Heritage site by UNESCO.

The eastern aspect of Fountains Abbey

The eastern aspect of Fountains Abbey
20 September 2016

Mount Grace Priory


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Mount Grace Priory – 20 September 2016

At the end of the 14th century, Thomas Holland, 1st Duke of Surrey founded the Carthusian house of Mount Grace Priory.

Mount Grace Priory church from the cloister

Mount Grace Priory church from the cloister
20 September 2016

There is a small church at the centre of the enclave. The tower (added in 1420) and some of the walls still stand, whilst the outline is clear to follow. A feature of the ruin is a recent statue of the Virgin Mary holding the Christ Child in the form of a cross, which combines the symbolism of the birth and crucifixion. The artist, Malcom Brocklesby, title this Madonna and Child when it was made in 1996.

Madonna and Child by Malcom Brocklesby

Madonna and Child by Malcom Brocklesby
20 Spetember 2016

As we found later in the date there is another depiction of this statue in Ripon Cathedral.

Unlike the Monastic foundations at Fountains, Bylands, Rivealux and Whitby (all visited later in our holiday), the Carthusian monks lived alone in individual cells around the Great Cloister, to the north of the church. They only ventured out to attend services in the church. This does mean that although the Priory has a large footprint there were few monks in residence (around 20 to 25).

Plan of Mount Grace Priory

Plan of Mount Grace Priory
20 September 2016

In their cells the monks slept, engaged in private prayer and meditation, work (e.g. weaving) and had a small garden. Cell 8 has been restored to give the visitor an impression of how the monks lived. As you enter, there is a small hatchway by the door for the monk to receive his meals, with an angle in it such that there is no direct line of sight through it.

Entrance to Cell 8

Entrance to Cell 8
20 September 2016

Downstairs there are two rooms:

A bedroom with a prayer desk

Bedroom in Cell 8

Bedroom in Cell 8
20 September 2017

A study with a table

Study in Cell 8

Study in Cell 8
20 September 2016

Upstairs there is one big room, which (in Cell 8) house a loom and other work areas.

Upstairs Workroom in Cell 8

Upstairs Workroom in Cell 8
20 September 2016

Going outside of the cell there is a covered walkway to the latrine and an enclosed garden that the monk would tend.

Garden of Cell 8

Garden of Cell 8
20 September 2017

Following the dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII, the Guest House remained intact until substantially altered by Lord Darcy [of Mount Grace] in the mid 17th century.

Mount Grace Priory Guest House

Mount Grace Priory Guest House
20 September 2016

The residence and the ruins passed through various hands until the 1950s when it was given to the state in lieu of death duties and put into the care of the National Trust, who entrust the management of the property to English Heritage.

Murals in the Nave


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St Peter & St Paul Parish Church, Pickering – 19 September 2016

Having arrived in Pickering via the North Yorkshire Moors Railway (NYMR), we went for a walk around Pickering and visited the Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul.

Porch and Tower

Porch and Tower
19 September 2016

Walking into the building, the medieval murals on the nave walls are one of the first things that are seen. Looking east, the chancel, high altar and east window are seen through the screen.

Chancel and High Altar

Chancel and High Altar
19 September 2016

The murals were painted in the 15th century and feature St George, St Christopher and various scenes from the bible.

Bible Scenes on the medieval murals

Bible Scenes on the medieval murals
19 September 2016

Within 100 years the murals were painted over. In 1852, they were accidentally uncovered. They were not to the liking of the vicar so they were covered up again. More recently they have been uncovered and restored. If you visit the church for no other reason, the murals are a delight to view.

Information Board in Market Street

Information Board in Market Street
19 September 2016

So if you are visiting North Yorkshire, you can either drive, or as we did take the NYMR train from the coast at Whitby, and the church can be found at the top of Market Place. You may even experience the market as we did on the day of our visit.


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Whitby 2016 – Sunday Morning at St Bartholomew’s Ruswarp

Our first full day in North Yorkshire was a Sunday, so we sought out the local church. Although it only had a Sunday service once a month, we were fortunate it was that particular Sunday.

St Bartholomew’s is part of a benefice which includes three churches in Whitby (St Mary the Virgin, St Hilda and St John the Evangelist). There are a number of clergy serving this benefice. We were to visit St Mary the Virgin and St Hilda’s later in our holiday.

Situated in the centre of the village by the river Esk and the railway level crossing, the church was a short walk from our accommodation.

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Parish Church of St Bartholomew, Ruswarp
18 September 2016

Entering the church the chancel caught our eye, the inscription on the beam at the entrance to the chancel and the ceiling over the high altar.

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Chancel of St Bartholomew’s Church
18 September 2016

Although the nave was laid out for a reasonable sized congregation (we estimated at around 120). The capacity has been reduced with a circulating area created at the west end where there is a small kitchen and tables.

The Sunday service took place in a side chapel with 16 seats.

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Altar and Stained Glass Window in side Chapel
18 September 2016

The congregation numbered 10, and it was the first time the then new Vicar in charge of the benefice had take a Sunday service at St Bartholomew’s.

One feature of the building is the number of carvings of mice on the woodwork and a cat. It took a little while to search them all out. These can be seen in the linked photo album.

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The cat on the font
18 September 2016

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The mouse on the pulpit
18 September 2016

 

Communion Table and Aspe at East End


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Parish Church of St Cuthbert, Edinburgh – 8 October 2016

After a short break, the blog returns with a visit to the Parish Church of St Cuthbert in Edinburgh.

Located at the end of Lothian Road, next to St John’s Episcopal Church, this church is at the west end of Princes Street gardens under Edinburgh Castle.

East End of St Cuthberts. Edinburgh

East End of St Cuthberts. Edinburgh
8 October 2016

There have been several buildings on the site. The early ones were on the shores of the Nor’Loch (which was drained and filled in during the 19th century when the railway was constructed). The current building was designed by Hippolyte Blanc and opened in 1894.

One of the features of the building is the pulpit. Under the pulpit is the foundation stone and a time capsule with 1890’s items.

The Pulpit

The Pulpit
8 October 2016

At the East End is the Apse with a painted ceiling by Robert Hope RSA. The centre panel features Christ, being worshiped by angels on either side.

Apse ceiling

Apse ceiling
8 October 2016

The font is provided with a bronze statue on its cover. This is a copy of Michaelangelo’s statue in the Church of Our Lady in Bruges.

Font Cover

Font Cover
8 October 2016

The organ was built in 1899 by Robert Hope-Jones of Birkenhead, and having been rebuilt several times, the current setup dates from 1997/8 when it was rebuilt by Walker & Sons. The four manual console is located in the south gallery of the chancel opposite the chancel organ case in the north chancel. The majority of the pipes are located in the North Gallery.

North Gallery Organ Loft

North Gallery Organ Loft
8 October 2016